revera-brandingRevera has released a platform called Apollo which will allow customers to head toward hybrid by utilising Revera’s in-border Azure Cloud services and Microsoft Azure platforms proper. Named after the rocket, we assume, this could be a game changer for government in the local market and certainly for private customers.

Apollo is the name of the local platform and comes with the usual self-service portal called CloudCreator.

This is an interesting offering because it puts the power of Azure within reach of companies and government agencies that don’t want to go offshore with their data. While I personally think the issue of data sovereignty moot, this certainly will help those organisations out there who think it is a high-enough risk to be valid to them.

Revera’s head of Innovation (we need more of these positions people) is quoted as saying:

Hybrid cloud architectures will define the future of IT service provision, Clients expect to work in a multi-cloud world, but still value dealing with a single partner who can guide workload management and optimise configuration.

We don’t need to sell anyone the benefits of Azure. But where we help is with interconnected platforms and tools that provide the best of both worlds: a blend of public cloud services and private, locally-based options in one ecosystem,” he said.

To get here, we’ve invested in command and control functions that provide access to a catalogue of services, manage cost and consumption, and provide a consistent user experience.

The other advantage of course is for multi-nationals based in, or with offices located in, New Zealand. Workloads can be moved between Apollo and Azure. This allows for more fine control over performance along with follow-the-sun operations. You could assume it will also allow workloads to be moved based on spot pricing for Cloud workloads, in the future.

The primary advantage that I see is that allows local customers to still have local contact with Revera while exploiting the power of Apollo and Azure. That relationship is more important in my opinion than data sovereignty ever will be. The capability to walk down the road, have a coffee or beer, and build those partnerships is worth gold.

Further, it shows that Revera is still investing in new partnerships and new technology. They need to. All local Cloud Providers need to keep themselves relevant and competitive in the ongoing Cloud Wars. Failure to create new products and move up the ICT stack away from bricks and mortar facilities management will result in eventual collapse.

I don’t know if this is open to government agencies under the Common Capability IaaS stack, however, even if it isn’t, I’d be looking very closely at it for certain workloads anyway.

Hybrid is king. This looks like a very interesting set of hybrid tools to supplement total Cloud services that you may be using.

Full Press Release Follows

Revera Apollo launches Azure-enabled services to local market

— Revera launches Azure-enabled services platform; signals push to multi-cloud offering

Wellington, 31 March 2015 – Revera has launched a dedicated Microsoft Azure-enabled platform, called Apollo, providing a single ecosystem to mix and match client workloads across Revera’s in-country Azure-enabled cloud platform and Microsoft Azure platforms.

Last year Revera teamed up with Microsoft engineers from the US to build Apollo to Microsoft Cloud OS Network reference architecture, providing compatibility that ensures client apps can be deployed on either Apollo or Microsoft Azure, without extra development.

The platform build also underscores Apollo’s self-service provisioning and management features, accessed through a Revera web portal, called CloudCreator.

Newly available in-country Azure-enabled services is good news for local businesses and government agencies whose data sovereignty and security policies preclude wholesale adoption of public cloud offerings.

Revera’s head of innovation Keith Archibald said public and private cloud services were on everyone’s radar, but consuming public cloud services was problematic for organisations unprepared to accept overseas-based data housing, performance vagaries and security that didn’t measure up to their own standards.

“Hybrid cloud architectures will define the future of IT service provision,” said Archibald. “Clients expect to work in a multi-cloud world, but still value dealing with a single partner who can guide workload management and optimise configuration.

“We don’t need to sell anyone the benefits of Azure. But where we help is with interconnected platforms and tools that provide the best of both worlds: a blend of public cloud services and private, locally-based options in one ecosystem,” he said.

“To get here, we’ve invested in command and control functions that provide access to a catalogue of services, manage cost and consumption, and provide a consistent user experience,” said Archibald.

Brent Kendrick, Microsoft New Zealand’s Director for Small Business & Partners, welcomed the platform launch, affirming that Revera Apollo supports Microsoft’s drive to provide customers with the best of public and private cloud services.

“Cloud adoption is a question of efficiency, and the best answer involves aspects of the Azure public cloud and our Cloud OS Network partners’ in-country cloud.”

Archibald said Revera’s Azure-enabled service Apollo would appeal to local businesses with international connections. “Flexibility is key, and customers can decide where in the world they want to keep their data and manage workloads.”

He said the partnership with Microsoft was part of a shift to reshape Revera as a cloud services provider.

“The vast majority of growth is in the cloud and we’ve put ourselves right in the middle of everything our customers are asking for,” he said. “Historically, we’ve operated further down the stack, at the computing infrastructure and platform layers. We’re still strong there, and our Homeland data centres and utility compute continue to function as the building blocks of cloud services. But the plan was never to stop there, and new investment is driving our reinvention as a cloud services provider. So, more than simply corral raw capacity and manage its performance, we’ve moved up the stack, developed a portfolio of new on-demand services, wired in public cloud offerings, and overlaid a smart management console for customers and resellers to get going quickly and tie everything together,” said Archibald.

“So it’s an entirely new proposition – a fundamental shift that is crystallised in our new company strapline – cloud services provider. Our old company tag, high-integrity computing infrastructure, wasn’t going to do justice to our new form.”

ENDS.

News media contacts

Richard Carter         Keith Archibald

Talkies Group          Revera

021 526 559            021 493 539

2 comments

  1. Jesus. Azure running on Rivera – how much is that going to cost? Besides – what is the advantage unless you’re intending to eventually port all of your services into Azure proper?

  2. Saying that ‘data sovereignty’ doesn’t matter is not a light statement and there are very serious reasons to consider it. Based on US laws, both domestically focused and those which impact their MNCs like Microsoft, you can end up with a variety of problems. This doesn’t mean all data needs to kept inside your own country, but it does mean that leaving some things ‘local’ isn’t a bad idea, particularly if you can’t take the risk of having it ‘lost’ (or exposed). You also benefit from knowing what the legal requirements are in your home jurisdiction (or the ability to find out, if you don’t know). More data will inevitably move into the cloud, but whether you want that abstraction (which doesn’t mean someone else can’t potentially access it, potentially without your knowledge) is another matter. This seems a sensible solution and a good arrangement for both Revera and Microsoft (who now can tell customers that they can have local data protection and a local provider, which provides additional legal protection).

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